Skip navigation.
New Mexico State University
PRIMOS

Faculty - Other Workshops

PRIMOS is sponsoring the following workshops, for which you need to register at teaching.nmsu.edu If you have problems registering online, call 646-2299 for help.

Events

Title Date & Time Presenter
Are you really teaching if no one is learning?: How interactive lecturing can be used to measure and improve student learning. Friday, May 22,
2 - 5 p.m.
Ed Prather,
University of Arizona
Developing Meaningful, Manageable, Sustainable Assessment Programs Thursday, September 10,
9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Mary Allen,
California State University - Bakersfield
Developing and Using Rubrics for Assessing, Grading, and Improving Student Learning Friday, September 11,
9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Mary Allen,
California State University - Bakersfield
Teaching Critical Thinking: Are We Really Doing It? Friday, October 23,
8:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Bill Roberson and Tina Reimers
University at Albany, SUNY
Data-driven Inquiry: Strategies for Problematizing the Material of your Discipline Friday, October 23,
1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Bill Roberson and Tina Reimers,
University at Albany, SUNY
Creating Pathways to Success in STEM for Students with Low Math Scores Wednesday, January 6,
9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Gerald R. Urquhart
Lyman Briggs College, Michigan State University
Using Instructional Objectives to Improve Teaching and Learning Monday, February 1
9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Michael Prince
Bucknell University
Teaching Backwards: An Introduction to Inductive Teaching and Learning Methods Monday, February 1
1 p.m. -3 p.m.
Michael Prince
Bucknell University
Getting Started With Problem-Based Learning Monday, February 1
3:15 p.m. -5 p.m.
Michael Prince
Bucknell University
Teach Me! I Dare You! Thursday, March 4,
9:30-11:30 am OR 1:30-3:30 pm
Marilla D. Svinicki
University of Texas at Austin

 

Descriptions

Are you really teaching if no one is learning?: How interactive lecturing can be used to measure and improve student learning

Friday, May 22, 2 - 5 p.m.
Ed Prather
(University of Arizona)

The goal of this workshop is to help participants to implement interactive learning strategies into the lecture portion of their classrooms. From questioning in the classroom to small group collaborative activities, interactive teaching will be modeled by both workshop leaders and participants. Active audience participation will be required–no, really, it will be fun, really!!

Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona have been developing and conducting research on the effectiveness of learner-centered instructional strategies and materials that put students in an active role in the traditional lecture classroom. The results of this work have been incorporated into a series of “Teaching Excellence Workshops” that members of CAE have been conducting around the nation as part of the NASA Spitzer Education and Public Outreach Program, JPL Navigator/Exoplanet-Exploration Public Engagement Program.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Developing Meaningful, Manageable, Sustainable Assessment Programs

Thursday, September 10, 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Mary Allen
(California State University - Bakersfield)

Higher education professionals have moved from teaching-centered to learning-centered models for designing and assessing courses and curricula. Assessment is an integral component of this learner-centered approach and it involves using empirical data to refine programs and improve learning. Such assessment of academic programs should be meaningful, manageable, and sustainable.

Participants in this interactive workshop will learn:

  • How to refine program learning outcomes,
  • How to investigate the alignment of curricula with outcomes,
  • How to use rubrics to generate valid, reliable assessment results,
  • The strengths and limitations of a variety of assessment strategies,
  • How to develop a multi-year assessment plan that describes a series of well-planned, focused assessment studies, and
  • How to use assessment results to improve programs.

Participants will receive extensive reference materials for subsequent use, including a 60-page collection of assessment rubrics.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Developing and Using Rubrics for Assessing, Grading, and Improving Student Learning

Friday, September 11, 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Mary Allen
(California State University - Bakersfield)

Rubrics specify criteria that are used to sort student products or behaviors into categories that range along a continuum, such as from “not acceptable” to “exemplary” or from “does not meet expectations” to “exceeds expectations.” Rubrics are routinely used to guide the assessment of student learning, but they also can be effective tools for grading and improving learning. Participants in this interactive session will consider ways to integrate rubrics into assessment plans, as well as utilize them in the classroom to expedite grading, provide formative feedback, and encourage learning. They will learn how to develop rubrics, and they will draft rubrics for their own course or program learning outcomes. Participants should bring their learning outcomes to work on during the session. They may come alone, but departments are encouraged to send two- or three-person teams to collaborate on program learning outcomes.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Teaching Critical Thinking: Are We Really Doing It?

Friday, October 23, 8:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Bill Roberson and Tina Reimers
(University at Albany, SUNY)

Are we really successful at teaching critical thinking? In this interactive workshop participants will experience practical, immediately usable notions of critical thinking, which will help make visible what is often left invisible in the work of the university teacher. Participants will experience a sequence of increasingly complex learning activities designed to clarify the challenge of teaching critical thinking. The final outcome of the session will be participants’ application of “A Simple Plan,” which can be used by anyone, however skeptical, to develop assignments that promote critical reflection. Participants will design critical thinking exercises both in teams and individually, inside and outside their disciplines, and will discover how to design assessment strategies that measure the critical thinking students are doing.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Data-driven Inquiry: Strategies for Problematizing the Material of your Discipline

Friday, October 23, 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Bill Roberson and Tina Reimers
(University at Albany, SUNY)

How do we move from talking about critical thinking to doing it in the classroom? The answer lies in a “data-intensive” instructional approach, which transforms mundane textbook content into student learning activities that foster an “attitude of inquiry.” This session will demonstrate ways to problematize the material of a discipline so as to invite students into authentic engagement with significant discipline-specific questions. Participants will experience and analyze critical thinking tasks that place students into activities common among university faculty: inquiry, discovery, interpretation, invention, scholarship, and application of research. Each of these tasks illustrates different ways in which the common textbook material of academic study and research–the ordinary “data” of a discipline–can be transformed into inquiries that turn students into analysts, questioners, judges, decision-makers, and research designers. Session participants will be immersed in hands-on activities, and will begin developing their own Critical Thinking experiences for students.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Creating Pathways to Success in STEM for Students with Low Math Scores

Wednesday, January 6, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Gerald R. Urquhart
(Lyman Briggs College, Michigan State University)

As universities move toward inclusive opportunities for learning, the STEM disciplines–science, technology, engineering and mathematics–lag both in admission and retention of underrepresented
students. Even as admission barriers are breached with better recruiting and open admission, significant obstacles, such as deficiencies in high school and fixed curricular paths, may inadvertently
conspire against student success and result in low retention rates of underrepresented students. Inclusive STEM learning communities must overcome differences in preparation and redesign curricular paths to retain and graduate a diverse cohort of future scientists and engineers.

At Lyman Briggs College, our undergraduates have markedly different experiences that are largely predetermined by their incoming mathematics placement test. Students with lower math scores
(LMP) were entering a curriculum with mismatched learning environments that led to feelings of alienation and often resulted in withdrawal. To address these shortcomings, we developed curricular
reforms, including 1) a new, introductory Quantitative Science and Research course, taken before other science courses, 2) a revised curriculum that allows LMP students to succeed in STEM majors, and 3) a focus on cohort building among LMP students. Truly a work in progress, we hope that valuable insights can be gained from comparing efforts at Michigan State University and NMSU & DACC.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Using Instructional Objectives to Improve Teaching and Learning

Monday, February 1, 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.
Michael Prince
(Bucknell University)

Since ABET 2000 introduced the need for program instructional objectives, many engineering faculty think of instructional objectives as something used primarily for accreditation purposes. In fact, writing clear and assessable learning outcomes is simply an integral part of good instructional design. Having good instructional objectives and sharing these with students provide a number of clear benefits to both students and instructors.

This workshop will focus on practical “nuts and bolts” issues involved in writing and using instructional objectives in engineering and science courses. The workshop will discuss the motivation behind using instructional objectives, introduce Bloom's taxonomy as a framework for drafting appropriately challenging objectives and discuss how to write objectives that are clear and assessable. Throughout the workshop, the focus will be on how instructional objectives can be used in practice to improve teaching and learning.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Teaching Backwards: An Introduction to Inductive Teaching and Learning Methods

Monday, February 1, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
Michael Prince
(Bucknell University)

While science and engineering courses are traditionally taught deductively, research suggests that there are good reasons to sometimes “teach backwards” by introducing students to complex and realistic problems before exposing them to the relevant theory and equations. A broad range of inductive teaching methods such as inquiry-based learning, problem-based learning, case-based instruction and just-in-time teaching do just that. What these have in common is that students are presented with a challenge and then learn what they need to know to address that challenge. The methods differ in the nature and scope of the challenge and in the amount of guidance students receive from their instructor as they attempt to complete their tasks.

This workshop will introduce faculty to the benefits of inductive teaching methods and demonstrate how they can be combined with traditional instruction. The session is designed for faculty with limited experience in using these approaches and will therefore focus on instructional techniques that are quick to develop, easy to use and which do not generate significant student resistance. As one example of the benefits of inductive methods, the workshop will demonstrate how these techniques can be used to both uncover and help repair student misconceptions, something for which traditional deductive methods have proven to be much less effective.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Getting Started With Problem-Based Learning

Monday, February 1, 3:15 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Michael Prince
(Bucknell University)

Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a dynamic and engaging instructional method in which students are presented with relevant, open-ended problems which drive the desired learning. The instructor in PBL acts as a subject-matter expert and facilitator while students engage in a range of self-directed learning behaviors. Research on PBL demonstrates that it is generally more effective than traditional instruction for promoting a range of learning outcomes, including long-term retention of information, skill development, and student and instructor satisfaction.

While PBL is both an enjoyable and effective way to teach, it can be a challenge to implement in practice. This workshop will discuss how traditional science and engineering courses can be redesigned to adopt a PBL format. The primary focus will be on how to develop and use appropriate problems, along with a discussion of the pitfalls to be avoided in adopting PBL in practice.

Full announcement Register Back to top

Teach Me! I Dare You!

Thursday, March 4, 9:30-11:30 a.m. OR 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Marilla D. Svinicki
(University of Texas at Austin)

The biggest mystery for most faculty is how to motivate students to want to learn and not just work for a given grade. There is no real answer for this question, and we’ll never be free of the specter of grades hovering over our heads. However, there are some very helpful theories about motivation from the psychology and education iterature that can suggest ways of increasing the positive impact of intrinsic motivation, and decreasing the negative impact of extrinsic motivation in college students. The purpose of this session is to review what the literature on academic motivation has to say about this issue and to spend most of the time attempting to identify opportunities to foster this change within the structure of your existing classes.

Full announcement Register Back to top

  • NMSU Division of Student Success: PRIMOS - Faculty
  • Michaela Burkardt, Ph.D.
  • miburkar@nmsu.edu, (575) 646-7930
  • Room 50 Milton Hall, MSC 3TA, P.O. Box 30001
  • Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001